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Environment, Oil Mining Resources

What you didn’t know about sand, the art of closure and more

Day 1, Monday at the 26th World Mining Congress, Brisbane 3 mins read

Sand – the most mined mineral on Earth

Sustainable concrete for an urbanising world

The art of closure: mines turning to physics labs, parks, energy storage

The policies needed for critical minerals

We’re now expecting over 3500 delegates from 70 countries. Accreditation is still open.

Monday 26 June

8 am onward: Mineral policy and governance for the new economy

Including:

  • Mark Cutifani, Symposium chair at 8 am
  • Madelaine King, Federal Resources Minister, speaking at 8.15 and again later
  • Susan McDonald, Federal Shadow Minister for Resources and Northern Australia at 8.35
  • Tim Gould, Chief Energy Economist, International Energy Agency at 8.50
  • Scott Stewart, Queensland Resources Minister at 9.30.

8 am onward: Sustainable building materials

How can we mine sand and build cities sustainably? The neglected minerals of development, sand, gravels and concrete minerals, are critical to infrastructure everywhere.

Panellists from Australia, Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, the Pacific, Asia, the UNDP. Led by Professor Daniel Franks, UQ, with Professor Pascal Peduzzi, UNEP/GRID Geneva, and Uyanga Gankhuyag, UNDP.

8 am onward: Mine closure and post mining transitions

Over the coming decades many major mines around the world will cease production, and thousands of new mines will need to be built in record time. So, how do we do it, responsibly ?

Led by Tom Measham from CRC TiME with speakers from speakers from Australia, Africa, Mongolia, Europe, America. Full release at https://www.scienceinpublic.com.au/media-releases/the-art-of-closure

5.30 pm opening reception in exhibition space, Media Centre opens.

Tuesday 27 June

  • Opening ceremony from 8 am with Hua Guo, Congress Chair; Marek Cala, WMC international organising committee; Larry Marshall, CSIRO; Queensland government.
  • Plenaries with Rohitesh Dhawan, ICMM; Mike Henry, BHP; Duncan Wanblad, Anglo American plc; Fiona Hick, Fortescue; Sanjeev Gandhi, Orica; Professor Deborah Terry, UQ; Li Xiaohong, Chinese Academy of Engineering (pre-record); Tania Constable, Minerals Council of Australia.

Other topics include:

  • Big picture role of mining for the future of our planet
  • Between a rock and a hard place – Welcome to the future of mining
  • Mistrust in mining

Wednesday 28 June

We’ll have tech stories including AI, autonomous vehicles, EV, data.

Plenaries from 8.30 to 10.10 with Sinead Kaufman, Rio Tinto; Martín Pérez de Solay, Allkem; Ailie MacAdam, Bechtel Mining and Metals, Tom Palmer, Newmont Corporation.

Packages on how more extreme weather events will affect mining operations; critical minerals, and decarbonisation.

Thursday 29 June

Plenaries from 8.30 with Cathy Foley, Australia’s Chief Scientist; Sherry Duhe, Newcrest; Michael Wright, Thiess.

  • Packages on future, safety, diversity focus
  • Plus company announcements and op-eds.

About the Congress

The World Mining Congress was first held in 1958 in Poland. It has been held every two to three years ever since. It is UN-affiliated and continues to have a secretariat in Poland.

The 26th World Congress will be held for the first time in Australia, spanning the entire Brisbane Convention Centre from 26 to 29 June 2023. The Congress anticipates over 3000 participants from over 70 countries.

The Congress was brought to Australia with the support of the host, CSIRO, Australia’s National Science Agency. The Australian Government’s Department of Industry, Science and Resources is our Major Sponsor and Queensland is our Host State Sponsor. A large suite of leading global and national companies and research agencies are also major sponsors of the Congress.

Inclusion of Congress speakers in media releases does not imply endorsement by the WMC, its hosts, partners and sponsors.

 

 

 


Contact details:

For interviews and accreditation contact Niall Byrne, media@wmc2023.org   +61-417-131-977 an visit www.wmc2023.org.

Media releases at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/mining 

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