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Medical Health Aged Care, Seniors Interest

Museum promotes telling stories to prompt memories for people with dementia

Australian National Maritime Museum 2 mins read
Museum guest relives memories

The Australian National Maritime Museum has been trailing sessions aimed at people with dementia and their carers that promotes story sharing and to encourage social interaction and connection.

Seaside Stories are themed, hands-on reminiscence sessions where visitors can touch and hold museum objects. Museum educators (trained in dementia communication) ask questions and guide discussion. Participants are encouraged to share their personal recollections, stories and experiences in a safe and welcoming space.

The program, which includes a morning tea, concludes with an educator-led tour of the exhibitions. Tours are carefully planned to cater for participants’ sensory preferences, and mobility needs. Portable seating is available throughout the tour.

After the program, participants can explore the museum at their leisure. All areas of the museum and café are wheelchair accessible. Unfortunately, due to the vessel design and walkways on the vessels, wheelchair access is not available.

Ms Daryl Karp AM, Director and CEO said, ‘The feedback we have received has been so positive. The trained educators work carefully with participants helping to tease out memories.  What results are powerful and important experiences for both the participant and their carer. Each of us regardless of our age have stories to tell and share.’

2023 program schedule includes:

Swimming and the Beach
Participants share memories of swimming and visiting the sea; and hear the story of Kay Cottee’s circumnavigation of the world on an educator-led tour.

Suitcases and Travel

Participants share memories of travel, holidays and migration while holding museum objects from cruises, plane flights, camping trips and more. They take a tour through the Passengers exhibition and hear stories of migration to Australia.

Ships and Ropes

Participants touch ropes, compasses and binoculars. Recall times spent on ships, boats and watercraft and go on a guided walk along the waterfront.

For individual and their carers: Sessions run the first Wednesday of every month from 10am - 12pm. The cost is $26 per person ($20 for Members) this includes: reminiscence session, guided tour, catered morning tea and museum entry

For group bookings: These can be arranged when required.

For bookings go to : www.sea.museum/whats-on/events/seaside-stories

 

ENDS

For images click here Images for media

For interviews please contact:

Steve Riethoff                  e: steve.riethoff@sea.museum                 m 0417 047 837

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