Skip to content
Education Training, Foreign Affairs Trade

Monash University first in Victoria to offer Bachelor of International Relations

Monash University 2 mins read

In an era where global events shape local realities, Monash University is set to become the first university in Victoria, and third in Australia, to offer prospective students the opportunity to complete a Bachelor of International Relations. 

 

The new degree comes at a critical juncture and aligns with Monash’s commitment to providing students with a comprehensive understanding of global affairs, fostering a new generation of international leaders. 

 

Dr Tom Chodor, Senior Lecturer, Politics & International Relations and Program Director, said the three-year specialist degree will equip students with a deep understanding of power, governance, conflict and cooperation at various levels. 

 

“With the Bachelor of International Relations, we're not just preparing students for a job; we’re providing them with a deep understanding of global politics, empowering them to shape a better global future,” Dr Chodor said. 

 

“It goes beyond theoretical analysis and empowers our students to utilise their knowledge to make a tangible difference on a global scale.”

 

Led by experts in international relations and politics, the new degree will go beyond a conventional arts degree by offering five specialised fields of study: peace, conflict and security; policy and governance; comparative politics; development, rights and gender; and climate futures.

 

The comprehensive curriculum, coupled with the option of an international study tour, will immerse students in the complex world of international relations, and deliver unparalleled practical insights into how power shapes the world in which we live.

 

The new degree builds on Monash’s commitment to international relations education with its Masters of International Relations, for students looking to work on an international stage, particularly in the areas of trade, diplomacy, international security and development. The new undergraduate program is tailored for students aspiring to make a mark on the international stage, paving the way for a career that goes beyond borders and leaves a lasting imprint on the world stage.

 

As year 12 students receive their VCE results, Monash is encouraging any interested in building a career in international relations to consider changing their degree preferences to include the new Bachelor of International Relations. Students have an opportunity to change their preferences between receiving their results and round one of University offers in December.

 

-    ENDS    - 

 

Media Enquiries

Kim Loudon

Media and Communications Manager (Arts)

Monash University

T: +61 452 161 986

E: kim.loudon@monash.edu 

More from this category

  • Foreign Affairs Trade, Political
  • 28/02/2024
  • 07:05
ACFID

Flatlining Australian aid undermines regional security

Media release | Wednesday, 28 February 2024 Australia’s peak body for international development is calling on the government to urgently boost development assistance to buffer against threats to the region and help our partners deal with climate change. Australian Council for International Development CEO Marc Purcell called on the 2024-25 budget to double the nation’s foreign aid spend to strengthen Australia’s relationships in the Indo-Pacific. “The foreign aid budget is at an all-time low as a proportion of overall government spending. Without a substantial boost, this is set to flatline from 2026 even as global demand for humanitarian and development…

  • Education Training
  • 27/02/2024
  • 11:45
Independent Education Union - Queensland and Northern Territory (IEU-QNT)

Paid practicums crucial for future of teaching profession

The union representing staff in Queensland and Northern Territory non-government schools has endorsed the Federal Government’s Universities Accord Final Report recommendation to reduce financial pressure on teaching students by introducing paid practicums.The review backs long-running calls from unions and academics for students to be compensated for compulsory placements that currently lead to high dropout rates and financial stress.Independent Education Union – Queensland and Northern Territory (IEU-QNT) Branch Secretary Terry Burke said the change was overdue.“In a sector currently facing an attrition crisis, many potential teachers are deterred from the profession due to the reality of undertaking months of unpaid work,”…

  • Education Training, Information Technology
  • 27/02/2024
  • 10:59
Charles Darwin University

Expert tests if AI can help teach students accounting

ChatGPT will not be replacing human teachers anytime soon, with a study into the technology’s capabilities finding it can’t help students critically understand academic…

  • Contains:

Media Outreach made fast, easy, simple.

Feature your press release on Medianet's News Hub every time you distribute with Medianet. Pay per release or save with a subscription.