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Creative Australia reveals the title and first details of Archie Moore’s presentation at the 60th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia.

Creative Australia 8 mins read
Archie Moore / Fredrick Noel Clevens in kith and kin 2024 / Digitally altered found photograph / Australia Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2024 / Graphic design work: u017diga Testen and Stuart Geddes / u00a9 the artist / Courtesy: the artist and The Commercial

kith and kin at the Australia Pavilion will pay tribute to the fortitude of First Nations people.

 

  • Creative Australia has announced the first details of Archie Moore’s presentation in the Australia Pavilion for the 60th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, Venezia, curated by Ellie Buttrose.
  • kith and kin is the title of the presentation that will run from 20 April to 24 November 2024.
  • Archie Moore will transform the Australia Pavilion with his artwork that immerses the viewer in personal and universal stories by reflecting on Australia’s 254 year history within the 65,000+ year context of his Aboriginal family heritage.
  • kith and kin is a holographic map of relations which connects life and death, people and places, circular and linear time, everywhere and everywhen to a site for quiet reflection and remembrance” - Archie Moore

 

Creative Australia has today unveiled the title and first details of Archie Moore’s presentation at the 60th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, curated by Ellie Buttrose. Titled kith and kin, Moore’s exhibition in the Australia Pavilion will be a powerful and poignant exploration of his Kamilaroi, Bigambul, British, and Scottish heritage. Moore is only the second First Nations artist to have a solo presentation in the Australia Pavilion. On view from 20 April to 24 November 2024, kith and kin will mark the 25th anniversary of Australia’s participation in the Biennale Arte 2024.

 

For three decades, Moore (b. 1970, l. Redlands, Queensland) has created thought-provoking art that bridges the personal and the political. His work is rooted in experiences around identity and heritage, and speaks to wider themes of memory, racism, and the universality of the human family. In kith and kin, Moore will reflect on the nature and strength of Indigenous kinship, issues of surveillance and incarceration, the enduring impact of colonisation and First Nations language revival.

 

The guiding principle in kith and kin is that relationality is the root of identity. The exhibition draws upon Moore’s extensive research and unravels how his family history is entwined with the chronicles of the continent and more recently the nation of Australia. By tracing his Kamilaroi and Bigambul family back 65,000+ years, Moore asserts Indigenous sovereignty. Although First Nations peoples have been threatened by invasion, massacre, disease, and dispossession, Moore celebrates their continuing vitality. While the stories in kith and kin are often specific to the artist’s family, they mirror the narratives of indigenous and colonised people throughout the world.

 

Language is a recurring theme in the artist’s practice. Moore is attentive to the elimination of First Nations Australian languages, acknowledging the pernicious policies and social circumstances that have given rise to this loss. Due to colonial dispossession Moore’s mother knew little of her ancestral languages to pass on to her son. Moore has researched Gamilaraay (the language of the Kamilaroi Nation) and Bigambul terms and incorporated them into his artwork. He does this to signpost First Nations language revival movements taking place throughout the world.

 

Archie Moore said:The phrase ‘kith and kin’ simply means friends and family but an earlier Old English definition for Kith dates from the 1300s and originally meant ‘countrymen’ (kith also meant ‘one’s native land’) and Kin: ‘family members’. These words gradually took on the present looser sense: friends and family. Many Indigenous Australians, especially those who grew up on Country, see the land and other living things as part of their kinship system – the land itself can be a mentor, teacher, parent to a child. The sense of belonging involves everyone and everything and First Nations peoples of Australia, which, like most indigenous cultures, is deeply rooted in our sacred landscape from birth until death. I was interested in the phrase as it aptly describes the artwork in the pavilion, but I was also interested in the Old English meaning of the words as it feels more like a First Nations understanding of attachment to place, people and time.”

 

Australia’s history is inextricably linked with the carceral system. British colonisation was established with penal colonies from 1788, and today First Nations peoples in Australia are statistically some of the most incarcerated people globally. kith and kin examines this history via specific examples from Moore’s genealogy: his British and Scottish great-great-grandfather arrived as a convict in 1820; while his Kamilaroi and Bigambul great uncle was imprisoned in the notorious Boggo Road Gaol. With respect and solemnity, kith and kin will make visible the impact that the incarceration of Indigenous Australians has on familial connections.

 

Ellie Buttrose said:kith and kin physically immerses the audiences in the world of Archie Moore and lays bare how we are all entangled within his web of connections.”

 

Creative Australia Executive Director First Nations Arts and Culture Franchesca Cubillo said: To have an esteemed First Nations artist such as Archie Moore present this critical exhibition in the Australia Pavilion is something that all Australians can take pride in and celebrate. 2024 marks the 25th edition of Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale, and we're delighted this year that for the first time two First Nations Australian artists, Marlene Gilson and Naminapu Maymuru White, will also be showcased in the main exhibition with significant bodies of work. Creative Australia will also be co-hosting with ArtReview, a program of talks that will put First Nations voices and issues at the forefront of global discussion.”

 

The kith and kin exhibition has been developed by the artist and curator, with design consultant Kevin O’Brien of BVN, and digital designer Sebastian Adams.

 

The kith and kin publication features entries by Moore, sharing family stories that he has collected over his lifetime, and acclaimed writer Melissa Lucashenko, along with new essays by distinguished Professor, legal expert, writer and filmmaker Larissa Behrendt OA; Professor Macarena Gómez-Barris; curator and writer Djon Mundine OAM; and kith and kin curator Ellie Buttrose. The book includes a roundtable discussion with the artist, curator, Dhangatti and Gumbayngirr speaker and Indigenous language expert Doctor Raymond Kelly, linguistics Professor Felicity Meakins, anthropologist Emeritus Professor Diane Bell and editor Grace Lucas-Pennington. The graphic design work is by Stuart Geddes and Žiga Testen and it is edited by Archie Moore, Ellie Buttrose and Grace Lucas-Pennington.

 

Australia’s participation in the Biennale Arte 2024 has been philanthropically supported since the early 1980s. In 2024, this co-investment approach is led by the Creative Australia Chair and Chair of the Venice Biennale Ambassadors, Mr Robert Morgan. Mr Morgan is joined and supported by national Ambassadors Alexandra Dimos, Russell James OAM, Marie-Louise Theile, Alenka Tindale and Dr Terry Wu.

 

Exhibition Details:

Australia Pavilion at the 60th International Art Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia

Address: Australia Pavilion, Giardini di Castello 30122

Press preview days: 17 – 19 April 2024

Exhibition dates: 20 April – 24 November 2024

Exhibition website: kithandkin.me

 

Credit line: The Australia Pavilion at the Biennale Arte 2024 is commissioned by Creative Australia, 20 April – 24 November 2024, creative.gov.au

 

Photo credit: Archie Moore / Fredrick Noel Clevens in kith and kin 2024 / Digitally altered found photograph / Australia Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2024 / Graphic design work: Žiga Testen and Stuart Geddes / © the artist / Courtesy: the artist and The Commercial

 

Press images: via Dropbox here

 

For international media enquiries, please contact:

Rel Hayman | Pelham Communications

T: +44 (0)20 8969 3959| E: rel@pelhamcommunications.com

 

For media enquiries within Australia and New Zealand, please contact:

Claire Martin | ARTICULATE

T: +61 (0) 414 437 588 | E: claire@articulatepr.com.au

 

 

About the Artist: Archie Moore

 

Kamilaroi/Bigambul artist Archie Moore (b. 1970, Toowoomba) works across media in conceptual, research-based portrayals of self and national histories. His ongoing interests include key signifiers of identity (skin, language, smell, home, genealogy, flags), the borders of intercultural understanding and misunderstanding and the wider concerns of racism.

 

Recent solo exhibitions by Archie include: Pillors of Democracy, Cairns Art Gallery, 2023; Dwelling (Victorian Issue) 2022, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne; The Colour Line: Archie Moore & W.E.B. Du Bois 2021, University of New South Wales Galleries, Sydney; and Archie Moore 1970–2018 2018, Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane. Significant recent group exhibitions comprise: Ever Present: First Peoples Art of Australia 2022, National Gallery of Singapore; Embodied Knowledge: Queensland Contemporary Art 2022, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; UN/LEARNING AUSTRALIA 2021, Seoul Museum of Art; Indigenous Art Triennial 2017, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; The National: New Australian Art 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney; and Biennale of Sydney 2016, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. In 2018, Archie’s United Neytions was permanently installed at Sydney Airport’s International Terminal.

 

Archie’s artworks are held in major public collections across Australia including: Artbank; Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane; Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne; Murray Art Museum Albury; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Newcastle Art Gallery; Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; Queensland University of Technology Art Museum, Brisbane; University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane; and University of Sydney; and University of Technology Sydney.

 

Archie Moore is represented by The Commercial, Sydney.

 

About the Curator: Ellie Buttrose

 

How aesthetic debates inform the political imaginary is the subject of Ellie Buttrose’s curatorial projects and critical writing.

 

Ellie is the Curator of Contemporary Australian Art at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane. With Katina Davidson, Curator, Indigenous Australian Art, she co-curated Embodied Knowledge 2022 that featured the centrepiece commission Inert State 2022 by Archie Moore. Ellie recently curated: Living Patterns 2023 focused on artists who deploy abstraction as a formal and a political device; Work, Work, Work 2019 about the entwinement of civic and artistic labour; and Limitless Horizon: Vertical Perspective 2017, which rethought the impact of drone vision on contemporary art via the birds’-eye view paintings of Indigenous Australian songlines and the floating perspective found in Chinese and Japanese landscape painting traditions. Ellie is a member of the curatorial team for The Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art 2024, 2021 and 2018.

 

In 2020, 2019 and 2018, Ellie was a guest curator for the Brisbane International Film Festivals; she curated Material Place: Reconsidering Australian Landscapes 2019 at University of New South Wales Galleries, Sydney, which considered how experiments with artistic media reflect changing attitudes towards the environment; and served on the curatorium for Cosmopolis: Collective Intelligence 2017 at Centre Pompidou, Paris, that showcased artistic practices centred on knowledge sharing and the development of social fabric.

 

About Creative Australia

 

Creative Australia is the Australian Government’s principal arts investment and advisory body.

 

With artists at the heart of what we do, we invest in creative talent and stimulate the market for Australian stories to be told on a national and international scale, sharing our rich culture with the world. We do this because art and creativity define us, recording what we have been and what we might yet become. As a nation, creativity connects us and benefits us all.

 

We are proud of our 50-year history of investing in First Nations Arts and Culture and supporting First Nations self-determination. Creative Australia will build on this legacy in 2024 when the inaugural First Nations-led Board will be appointed.

 

Creative Australia is for the artist.

 

Creative Australia is for us all.

 

 

About the Australia Pavilion

 

The award-winning Australia Pavilion, designed by Denton Corker Marshall, opened in 2015. Mathew Doyle of the Muruwari people led the smoking ceremony for the Pavilion’s opening. The Pavilion is the first (and currently only) permanent 21st-century structure built in the Giardini della Biennale.

 

The Australia Pavilion’s form was designed to be as simple as possible. The architects describe it as a “white box within a black box, carefully positioned on the site to ensure minimal impact on the existing landscape”. Large slabs of black granite give the building its dark exterior. Some panels fold open to reveal the clean white interior and allow some natural light inside. These protruding panels aim to enable the building to take on a new appearance when an exhibition is taking place.

 

The Australia Pavilion is one of only 29 national pavilions within the Biennale Gardens, all built at different periods by various countries. The development of the Pavilion was made possible through a public-private partnership led by what was the Australia Council for the Arts (now Creative Australia) with the then Commissioner Simon Mordant AM. The original pavilion, designed as a temporary structure by Philip Cox, opened in 1988 and hosted 22 artists during its lifetime.

 


Contact details:

 

For international media enquiries, please contact:

Rel Hayman | Pelham Communications

T: +44 (0)20 8969 3959| E: rel@pelhamcommunications.com

 

For media enquiries within Australia and New Zealand, please contact:

Claire Martin | ARTICULATE

T: +61 (0) 414 437 588 | E: claire@articulatepr.com.au

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