Skip to content
Union

Dodgy training college crackdown welcome and overdue

Electrical Trades Union < 1 mins read

The Electrical Trades Union has strongly endorsed the Federal Government’s crackdown on dodgy training colleges that are ripping off international students.

 

New laws will enable the Government to close down training organisations that offer unauthorised courses and facilitate international students to work illegally with dodgy operators facing fines of up to $939,000. Colleges that are dormant for 12 months will also have their registrations cancelled. The laws also allow the minister to block applications and require training organisations to have operated for more than two years before expanding course offerings.

 

ETU National Secretary, Michael Wright, said the reforms were a critical step to ensuring the integrity of vocational education.

 

“Only a minority of training organisations are dodgy, but they are trashing Australia’s reputation and exploiting often vulnerable international students,” Wright said.

 

“Misusing student visas to funnel migrants into workplace exploitation is completely unconscionable. This set of reforms is strong and overdue.

 

“The bald truth is that profit-making businesses have no place in training. We need operators who want to solve the skills shortage, not make a quick buck.”

 

“Organisations that are doing the right thing are sick of watching shonks get away with rip off schemes. Minister O’Connor and the Federal Government have done the right thing by moving decisively.”

Contact: Nick Lucchinelli 0422229032

More from this category

  • Union, Utilities
  • 26/02/2024
  • 06:30
Electrical Trades Union NSW & ACT

Parliament House sparkies take 24-hour strike

Electricians and trades staff who keep Parliament House up and running will walk off the job for 24 hours on Monday over poor pay.Members from the Electrical Trades Union, Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Union and CFMEU will demand fairer wages at a rally on the front lawns as both Houses sit.ETU NSW & ACT Secretary Allen Hicks said some full-time electrical employees working for the Department of Parliamentary Services were paid about $30,000 below the industry average.“The workers who keep the lights on at Parliament House are being blocked out when it comes to fair wages,” Mr Hicks said.“The Department of…

  • Political, Union
  • 22/02/2024
  • 07:06
Unions NSW

Unions endorse SafeWork shift into standalone regulator, but more must be done

Unions NSW endorses a recommendation to transform SafeWork into a standalone regulator following a 12-month inquiry led by former judge Robert McDougall KC. “We endorse the government's ongoing efforts to reform and rebuild a broken system,” Unions NSW Secretary, Mark Morey said. “Transforming SafeWork into an independent statutory corporation is an important step. Workers need a robust regulator that will actively keep them safe at work." The report also calls for improvements in SafeWork’s incident triaging capabilities, the responsiveness of contact centre staff, and the consolidation of SafeWork staff. These reforms are essential to building a more efficient and effective…

  • Political, Union
  • 19/02/2024
  • 05:40
ETU

Electrical Trades Union

Apprenticeship review must focus on mentoring, wages to lift abysmal completion rateThe Federal Government’s review of apprenticeships must consider how rock bottom wages and the complete absence of industry based mentoring contribute to four in ten electricians not completing their training, jeopardising the clean energy transition.Australia needs an additional 32,000 electricians by 2030, and another 85,000 by 2050, according to Jobs and Skills Australia. However the current apprenticeship system is failing. Electrical completions are approximately 59 per cent whilst trade training in general is only 42.2 per cent.Apprentice incomes are below minimum wage, a problem that has become more acute…

Media Outreach made fast, easy, simple.

Feature your press release on Medianet's News Hub every time you distribute with Medianet. Pay per release or save with a subscription.