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Expert articles & sources – Indonesia’s election

360info 2 mins read
Indonesia election on February 14 2024. Michael Joiner, 360info
Democracy faces numerous stiff tests in 2024 and none more so than in Indonesia, which goes to the polls on Valentine's Day - February 14.

This democratic love-in is massive:  204 million voters having their say on 300,000 people from 18 political parties contesting more than 20,000 seats across various legislatures.

All eyes are on the presidential contest, between three pairs of candidates. Incumbent Joko Widodo cannot run because of term limits but has controversially manoeuvred his 36-year-old son into running alongside an old adversary, former army general Prabowo Subianto

Jobs, corruption and climate are the big issues. While the outcome is unclear, young voters are set to have an enormous impact on the result.
 
The articles below are available to be republished for free under Creative Commons 4.0, and can also be used as a resource for ideas and interview sources (with attribution). Links will direct you to register 360info's free wire service. 

Young voters care about climate change. Politicians don’t
Eka Permanasari and Ika Idris, Monash University, Indonesia
Young people want action on climate change but research shows Indonesia’s political class isn’t listening.

Candidates sing the same old song of anti-corruption
Elisabeth Kramer, UNSW
The presidential contenders are playing up their commitment to fighting an old problem — but with few new details.

Jokowi anointed his son and social media reacted as you’d expect
Ika Idris, Derry Wijaya, Musa Wijanarko and Prasetia Pratama, Monash University, Indonesia
Every election social media is ablaze with polarising content. This year it’s President Joko Widodo who’s stoked the flames.

Indonesia’s young voters: precarious and sidelined by the system
Diatyka Widya andPermata Yasih, Universitas Indonesia
Young Indonesians are told that their votes can make a difference, but the political system offers few ways to address their discontent.

Social media brings young Indonesians in from political fringe
Rachmah Ida, Airlangga University
Social media has become a powerful tool for younger Indonesian voters to engage with a political system that otherwise leaves them at the margins.

Fewer women in parliament spells trouble
Hurriyah, Universitas Indonesia
Changes to Indonesia's gender quota rules are set to result in fewer women running for office in 2024. It could set Indonesia's democracy into a deeper backslide.

Wedding-party democracy is a marriage on the rocks
Abdul Gaffar Karim, Universitas Gadjah Mada
Elections remain a cause for celebration in Indonesia, but without firming up the processes around it, the party might end up being just a democratic facade. 


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About 360info

360info is a Not-For-Profit public interest journalism initiative. Editorial focus is on big-picture global issues, rather than breaking news. A team of professional journalists and editors commission university-affiliated academics around the world to write features, explainers & contextual pieces, then translate their work into plain, understandable language. 


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