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Medical Health Aged Care

Intravenous iron treatment Ferinject® (ferric carboxymaltose) now approved for Australian children aged one to thirteen years living with iron deficiency anaemia

CSL Seqirus 5 mins read
  • Ferinject is now indicated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in children.1
  • Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and the leading cause of anaemia in children.2,3
  • The condition is particularly prevalent in children, adolescents, pre-menopausal women, pregnant women and people living with chronic diseases.4 In Australia, an estimated 8% of pre-school children, 12% of pregnant women and 15% of non-pregnant women are living with anaemia (with iron deficiency anaemia a major cause).2
  • Symptoms of Iron deficiency anaemia include fatigue, dizziness, restlessness and loss of appetite.3,5 It can also be associated with impaired cognitive development and children living with the condition are more likely to struggle at school. 5


MELBOURNE, 19 February 2024

 

CSL Seqirus has confirmed that its intravenous (IV) iron treatment, Ferinject®, is now indicated in Australia for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in children aged one to thirteen years when oral iron preparations are ineffective or cannot be used. It can be prescribed to eligible patients following the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia by a healthcare professional.

 

Iron deficiency anaemia occurs when your body doesn't have enough iron to produce haemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to different parts of the body.2 Common symptoms of iron deficiency anaemia include fatigue, dizziness, restlessness and loss of appetite.3,5

 

Currently approved for use in adults and adolescents aged fourteen years and older for iron deficiency, the new approval means eligible patients 13 and under with iron deficiency anaemia can now receive Ferinject treatment to help replenish their iron stores.1  

 

Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and the leading cause of anaemia in children.2,3 The condition is prevalent in children, adolescents, pre-menopausal women, pregnant women and people living with chronic diseases.4 In Australia, it has been estimated that approximately 8% of pre-school children, 12% of pregnant women and 15% of non-pregnant women to be living with anaemia (with iron deficiency anaemia a major cause).2

 

Associate Professor Daniel Lemberg, Paediatric Gastroenterology Senior Staff Specialist at Sydney Children's Hospital, says that treating iron deficiency is essential in helping those affected by this issue in order to live a full life. 

 

“Iron deficiency is one of the most prevalent medical issues among Australian children. The news of another treatment option for children aged one to thirteen years when oral iron preparations are ineffective or cannot be tolerated is welcome news,” says Associate Professor Daniel Lemberg.

 

“Children may be at risk of developing iron deficiency, especially young adolescents who experience rapid growth and heavy menstrual bleeding. Supporting the health and growth of children impacted by this condition remains a key priority, and having an additional treatment option available for this age group is a positive step forward as we do just that,” says Associate Professor Daniel Lemberg.

 

Associate Professor Pradeep Jayasuriya, a leading Perth-based GP who has a specialised interest in iron deficiency, says iron deficiency anaemia is often associated with impaired cognitive development.3,5

 

“Iron deficiency anaemia can disrupt every facet of a child's daily life.6 If left untreated, children living with this condition may experience symptoms including fatigue, dizziness, mental fog and struggle with school work. By ensuring children and their parents have access to the treatments and care they need, we can mitigate the impact the condition has on daily life for those affected.”5,6

 

“It is also important for parents and carers to be aware of the common symptoms associated with iron deficiency anaemia and speak with your doctor if concerned. Symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness and pale skin can often be overlooked so greater education and awareness is needed to encourage testing," says Associate Professor Jayasuriya.3,6

 

Claire Morgan, CSL Seqirus Medical Director for Pharmaceuticals, said this is an important milestone for young Australians living with iron deficiency anaemia.  

 

“Australians living with iron deficiency anaemia experience many symptoms that significantly impact their daily lives. The new indication for Ferinject for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in children will provide young Australians with access to an additional treatment option to help manage their symptoms and the burden of this condition,” says Claire Morgan.

 

“CSL Seqirus is committed to improving quality of life for children living with iron deficiency anaemia and this news is evidence of that.”

 

ENDS

Media Contact

 

For further information or to request an interview, please contact:

 

Juliette Bagwell

Account Manager

Palin Communications

juliette@palin.com.au

0433 336 487

Hamish Walsh

Senior Communications Business Partner

CSL Seqirus

hamish.walsh@seqirus.com

0422 424 338

 

PBS Information: Ferinject 10 mL (500 mg iron) and Ferinject 20 mL (1,000 mg iron) is listed on the PBS as a parenteral iron preparation.

 

Consumer Medical Information available at cslseqirus.com.au/products

 

About CSL Seqirus

 

CSL Seqirus is part of CSL Limited (ASX: CSL). As one of the largest influenza vaccine providers in the world, CSL Seqirus is a major contributor to the prevention of influenza globally and a transcontinental partner in pandemic preparedness. With state-of-the-art production facilities in the U.S., the U.K. and Australia, and leading R&D capabilities, CSL Seqirus utilizes egg, cell and adjuvant technologies to offer a broad portfolio of differentiated influenza vaccines in more than 20 countries around the world.

 

In Australia, CSL Seqirus operates the only local manufacturing facility for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine and produces a range of unique medicines in the national interest including antivenoms and the world’s only human vaccine for Q fever. The company also in-licenses a broad range of paediatric and adult vaccines and specialty pharmaceutical products.

 

About CSL

 

CSL (ASX: CSL; USOTC: CSLLY) is a leading global biotechnology company with a dynamic portfolio of lifesaving medicines, including those that treat haemophilia and immune deficiencies, as well as vaccines to prevent influenza. Since our start in 1916, we have been driven by our promise to save lives using the latest technologies. Today, CSL – including our three businesses, CSL Behring, CSL Seqirus and CSL Vifor – provides lifesaving products to patients in more than 100 countries and employs 30,000 people. Our unique combination of commercial strength, R&D focus and operational excellence enables us to identify, develop and deliver innovations so our patients can live life to the fullest. For inspiring stories about the promise of biotechnology, visit CSLBehring.com/Vita and follow us on Twitter.com/CSL.

 

For more information about CSL, visit www.csl.com.

 

About Ferinject  

 

Ferinject® is an intravenous (IV) iron therapy, indicated for the treatment of iron deficiency (adults and adolescents aged 14 years and older) and iron deficiency anaemia (children aged 1 to 13 years); where oral iron is ineffective, cannot be used or there is a need to delivery iron rapidly. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia must be based on laboratory tests. Ferinject Consumer Medicine Information can be found here.

 

Ferinject® is a trademark of Vifor (International) AG, Switzerland. Seqirus (Australia) Pty Ltd. Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ABN 66 120 398 067. Medical Information: 1800 642 865. AU-FERI-23-0023. Date of Preparation: October 2023.

 

References:

 

  1. Ferinject Product Information.  
  2. Pasricha SR, et al. Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anaemia: a clinical update. Med J Aust 2010; 193 (9): 525-532. doi: 10.5694/j.1326-5377.2010.tb04038.
  3. Özdemir N. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children. Turk Pediatri Ars. 2015 Mar 1;50(1):11-9. doi: 10.5152/tpa.2015.2337.
  4. Aksan A, Zepp F, Anand S, Stein J. I. Eur J Pediatr. 2022 Nov;181(11):3781-3793. doi: 10.1007/s00431-022-04582-w.
  5. Gwetu TP, Taylor M, Chhagan M, Kauchali S, Craib M. Health and educational achievement of school-aged children: The impact of anaemia and iron status on learning. Health SA. 2019 May 20;24:1101. doi: 10.4102/hsag.v24i0.1101.
  6. Jáuregui-Lobera I. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2014 Nov 10;10:2087-95. doi: 10.2147/NDT.S72491. PMID: 25419131; PMCID: PMC4235202.

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